Anyone can refer an Airman to the AFW2 Program. Simply download the worksheet below and email it here.

Wounded, Ill, and Injured Referral Worksheet

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AFW2 Program Mailing Address

  • HQ AFPC/DPFW
  • ATTN: AFW2
  • 550 C St. West, Ste. 37
  • JBSA Randolph TX
  • 78150-4739

It's a 'new beginning'

Vickie LeBrun, of Great Falls, Montana, takes aim with an air rifle during the annual Joint Northwest Regional CARE event on Lewis Main. The Air Force Wounded Warrior Program conducts these events throughout the U.S. at 6 different locations. (Courtesy photo).

Vickie LeBrun, of Great Falls, Montana, takes aim with an air rifle during the annual Joint Northwest Regional CARE event on Lewis Main. The Air Force Wounded Warrior Program conducts these events throughout the U.S. at 6 different locations. (Courtesy photo).

Joint Base Lewis-McChord --

Air Force Master Sgt. Earla Webb, currently attached to the Air National Guard’s 165th Airlift Wing in Savannah, Ga., never thought she would be playing sports again after suffering several injuries from a deployment to Afghanistan in 2011.

As Webb participated in the third annual Joint Northwest Regional Warrior C.A.R.E. event Monday through Thursday at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Webb found herself being active again for the first time since her deployment.

In 2011, Webb suffered from injuries to the back and neck and also suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder. She continues to struggle with chronic migraines and body pains, and she recently had foot surgery.

Webb was able to play wheelchair basketball at the McChord Field Fitness Center — a variation of the sport she played through her middle and high school years in Lake City, S.C.

“This is giving me the opportunity to get back to some of the things I used to do,” Webb said.

She also tried other activities, including wheelchair racing. All in all, she was able to find new ways to be as active as she was before 2011 — back to the kind of person who ran 6 to 8 miles per day.

“Seeing I can do the things I didn’t think I could, it gives me some hope,” Webb said. “This is giving me a new beginning in my life. This is my new start.”

Webb’s story was similar to more than 100 participants representing both the Army and the Air Force wounded warrior community. With the support from Madigan Army Medical Center’s Warrior Transition Battalion, the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program brought in ill and wounded service members and veterans from throughout the country to JBLM.

Through adaptive sports, the wounded warriors are learning different ways to be active. Finding a new way of doing something not only translates in sports but also in everyday life — which is a main goal for the overall C.A.R.E. event.

Casey Dockins, a medically retired Air Force first lieutenant, said it’s all about being able to focus on the “can” and less on the “can’t.” Dockins was injured by an improved explosive device in 2007 during a deployment to Iraq. He now has PTSD, a traumatic brain injury, damage to the spine and heart issues.

Speaking to the participants during the opening ceremony at Cowan Stadium on Monday, Dockins said they all had courage. Being part of a C.A.R.E. event means taking a step into the unknown — but not alone.

“Individually, you may seem invisible, but together, we can be invincible,” Dockins said. “We’re not broken; we’re just redesigned.”

The overall event featured more than just sports clinics with a few scrimmages at the end of the week. C.A.R.E. stands for Caregiver support, Adaptive and rehabilitative sports, Recovering mentorship and Employment and career readiness. The weeklong event also featured workshops revolving around music, journaling and transitioning from the military into the civilian world.

“In the end, our goal is to support them on their journey,” said Marsha Gonzales, branch chief of the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program.

Some participants are considering Warrior Games’ trials through their respective military branches — the path to qualify for the Department of Defense’s 2018 Warrior Games in June at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo., or maybe the 2018 Invictus Games October 2018 in Sydney, Australia.

For many wounded warriors, learning how to be active despite injuries means more than any medal that can be won at those competitions.

“I don’t want to feel like a lot of pieces,” Webb said. “I want to be whole again.”