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  • PTSD Awareness: Know When You Aren’t You

    According to the National Center for PTSD, the disorder is a mental health problem that some develop after experiencing or witnessing a lift-threatening event, like combat, a natural disaster, a car accident or sexual assault. Some people experience an event, have a grieving period, and then return to their old self with distant memories of what happened. Those who suffer from PTSD are unable to make the event a distant memory and become highly distressed when remembering that time in their life.
  • Fighting the demons: A "typical" Defender's story

    If there is a “typical” security forces Airman, Master Sgt. Dwayne Pyle (ret) says he was it. He loved his job and felt he was good at it, even though he did get into a little trouble during his first assignment in Germany.
  • Rescue dogs help heal wounded warriors

    Muffled gunfire reverberates from an unknown location within the building; Peter’s unwavering gaze is focused on his partner’s ‘six’ - three weeks of training is about to be put to the test.The Omaha Gun Club is host to certified training sessions between military service dogs and their handlers and is where Russ Dillon of Dillon’s Dogs likes to
  • Master Sgt. Jessica Clayton: An invisible wounds story of multiple traumas, continuous recovery, and resilience

    No matter where you’re from or your AFSC, everyone is at risk of developing an invisible wound. Any exposure to a traumatic event can be a trigger and every person responds to trauma differently. For some, a blow to the head, a serious accident, or a painful event could be enough, while for others it may take years of repeated combat exposure or
  • Team Fairchild takes Resilience Tactical Pause

    Team Fairchild hosted three base-wide all calls as part of the Air Force-wide Resilience Tactical Pause implemented by Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein and Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Kaleth O. Wright on August 7 at the base theater.
  • Finding a Way Through Depression

    His marriage ended on ugly terms. He had been depressed for months. He feared negative consequences to his career so he shared little of what he was going through with his friends and supervisor. Then, Senior Airman Michael Drinkwater made a plan that finally gave him a sense of relief.  But, it wasn’t relief from a plan to get well. Instead,
  • We are all healers

    Trauma is a part of life.  This is the adage of Trauma Specialist Peter Levine who reminds us that most of us have experienced or will experience an event that feels threatening or foreboding in such a way that it shakes our sense of reality.  This has been the case since the beginning of evolution.  Our ancestors experienced trauma and our children will likely experience some form of trauma. 
  • Seeking mental health treatment: 49th Maintenance Group chief shares his experience with PTSD

    “Dealing with a traumatic event from 2011 in Afghanistan, I realize now that I probably needed help long before 2018, but at the time I felt like I’d figured out how to control the ghosts in my head. I forced myself to keep them at bay, and instead of dealing with my problems, I just let them fester,” recalled Chief Master Sgt. Eric Corvin, 49th Maintenance Group Quality Assurance superintendent, as he opened up about his post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • Tech. Sgt. McLean: Overcoming depression

    Dim lights shined on a dark path as a young man followed his guide toward a wooden elevator, which rested on the edge of a deep, seemingly endless cavern. Nerves begin to take over as the young explorer thought of what was to come. The cart begins its descent into the darkness, becoming immersed in the shadows, eliminating all sight and heightening the rest of his senses in a pointless attempt to gather any bearing. Being completely surrounded by darkness, the feeling of a heavy discomfort overtakes the young man who then, out of curiosity, reaches his hand out to find that he is completely surrounded by nothing. Through his experiences in that dark cave, this is how Tech. Sgt. Garry McLean describes his battle with depression.
  • A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD

    Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty.One of the most effective therapies, practiced by many Air Force mental health professionals, is prolonged exposure therapy.PTSD symptoms can create a network of fear. Memories and sensations
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