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  • Technical Sgt. Joshua Williamson: From Coping to Seeking Treatment to Helping Airmen Stay Resilient

    Invisible wounds are as real and severe as physical wounds. If left untreated invisible wounds can have negative impacts on an Airman’s personal and professional life. It’s important for Airmen to recognize signs and symptoms of invisible wounds in themselves and in their peers, to ensure a mentally strong, resilient, and lethal Total Force. The Air Force is committed to supporting Airmen living with invisible wounds by providing a wide range of resources to support their recovery journey.
  • Capt. Joseph Siler to Fellow Airmen: "Go In, Get Help, and Get Back to the Fight"

    Invisible wounds are as real and severe as physical wounds. If left untreated invisible wounds can have negative impacts on an Airman’s personal and professional life. It’s important for Airmen to recognize signs and symptoms of invisible wounds in themselves and in their peers, to ensure a mentally strong, resilient, and lethal Total Force. The Air Force is committed to supporting Airmen living with invisible wounds by providing a wide range of resources to support their recovery journey.
  • A Day That Resonates

     By looking at him you wouldn’t know it, but Tech Sgt. Trevor Brewer, a flight chief with the 72nd Security Forces Squadron at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, has deep scars from a day seven years ago that took the lives of two fellow Airmen, and severely wounded two others. His wounds are invisible. He has post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Finding healing through helping others

    “Seeking care never slowed me down; it helped me through my toughest times.” Senior Master Sgt. Richard “Joe” Chwalik has been through a lifetime’s worth of setbacks; incidents that have left long-lasting emotional scars. Yet, he found his way through the darkness by asking for help when he needed it most.  Like many, Chwalik witnessed a lot during
  • Exposing invisible wounds: A personal story about PTSD, healing

    Tech. Sgt. Joshua Brooks landed at Balad Air Base, Iraq, for the first time in January 2010. An airman 1st class at the time, Brooks was eager to be on his first deployment for the Air Force. “I was so excited about going. I was really blue early in my career--really blue,” Brooks said.  Brooks, a munitions troop, worked at night, building bombs,
  • Volunteers needed for invisible wounds interviews

    The Air Force is seeking volunteers, including commanders at every level, to participate in interviews that will be used to develop a strategy to provide better care and support for Airmen and their families struggling with invisible wounds such as post-traumatic stress, traumatic brain injury and major depression. A Booz Allen Hamilton culture
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