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  • Air Force Aviator Offers Advice on Finding the Right Counselor

    Capt Casey Ross is an Air Force aviator with the 120th Airlift Wing of the Montana Air National Guard, stationed at Great Falls Air National Guard Base at Great Falls International Airport in Great Falls, Mont. After she was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to childhood trauma, finding the right counselor was a critical
  • The Journey to Seeking Help for Multiple Traumas

    “We all experience traumas in our lives. Life is stressful by itself—and there are members in uniform and their families dealing with additional stressors that the civilian population might not understand.” Retired Master Sgt. Adam Boccher finishes this thought, “I would tell people, it’s normal to seek help when you experience a traumatic event.
  • Technical Sgt. Joshua Williamson: From Coping to Seeking Treatment to Helping Airmen Stay Resilient

    Invisible wounds are as real and severe as physical wounds. If left untreated invisible wounds can have negative impacts on an Airman’s personal and professional life. It’s important for Airmen to recognize signs and symptoms of invisible wounds in themselves and in their peers, to ensure a mentally strong, resilient, and lethal Total Force. The Air Force is committed to supporting Airmen living with invisible wounds by providing a wide range of resources to support their recovery journey.
  • Capt. Joseph Siler to Fellow Airmen: "Go In, Get Help, and Get Back to the Fight"

    Invisible wounds are as real and severe as physical wounds. If left untreated invisible wounds can have negative impacts on an Airman’s personal and professional life. It’s important for Airmen to recognize signs and symptoms of invisible wounds in themselves and in their peers, to ensure a mentally strong, resilient, and lethal Total Force. The Air Force is committed to supporting Airmen living with invisible wounds by providing a wide range of resources to support their recovery journey.
  • Recognizing the Signs of Invisible Wounds and Promoting a Culture of Support

    Invisible wounds are as real and severe as physical wounds. If left untreated invisible wounds can have negative impacts on an Airman’s personal and professional life. It’s important for Airmen to recognize signs and symptoms of invisible wounds in themselves and in their peers, to ensure a mentally strong, resilient, and lethal Total Force. The Air Force is committed to supporting Airmen living with invisible wounds by providing a wide range of resources to support their recovery journey.
  • Capt. Casey Ross: “I Owe my Life to my Commanders”

    Invisible wounds are as real and severe as physical wounds. If left untreated invisible wounds can have negative impacts on an Airman’s personal and professional life. It’s important for Airmen to recognize signs and symptoms of invisible wounds in themselves and in their peers, to ensure a mentally strong, resilient, and lethal Total Force. The Air Force is committed to supporting Airmen living with invisible wounds by providing a wide range of resources to support their recovery journey.
  • From Feeling Fine to Triggered: Recognizing the Signs and Symptoms of Invisible Wounds

    Invisible wounds are as real and severe as physical wounds. If left untreated invisible wounds can have negative impacts on an Airman’s personal and professional life. It’s important for Airmen to recognize signs and symptoms of invisible wounds in themselves and in their peers, to ensure a mentally strong, resilient, and lethal Total Force. The Air Force is committed to supporting Airmen living with invisible wounds by providing a wide range of resources to support their recovery journey.
  • PTSD Awareness: Know When You Aren’t You

    According to the National Center for PTSD, the disorder is a mental health problem that some develop after experiencing or witnessing a lift-threatening event, like combat, a natural disaster, a car accident or sexual assault. Some people experience an event, have a grieving period, and then return to their old self with distant memories of what happened. Those who suffer from PTSD are unable to make the event a distant memory and become highly distressed when remembering that time in their life.
  • Month of the Military Caregiver: Hidden Heroes

    May is recognized as the Department of Defense’s Month of the Military Caregiver. This time is used to honor, commend, and show appreciation for those that care for wounded, ill and injured service members. The Air Force Wounded Warrior Program (AFW2) has a Caregiver Support and Family Program to assist caretakers in multiple ways,
  • How Leaders Helped Maj. Harmer Find the Support to Overcome His Invisible Wounds

    In 2004, Maj Chris Harmer left an abusive childhood home and joined the Air Force to be part of something larger than himself. He quickly found a home in the AF Medical Community and flourished both at work and at home over the next decade. “All felt right in life,” recalls Harmer, along with his wife of 16 years, Shelley.Then the symptoms began.In
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