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  • Better Than the Last: Tech. Sgt. Matthew Sigmon’s Journey of Faith and Recovery from PTSD and Moral Injury

    Sleep did not come easily in the wake of his first deployment, as the whistling of a mortar shell would often stir Tech. Sgt. Matthew Sigmon in the quietest hours of the night. It was a persistent trauma from an unfinished chapter in his life and a lingering, unseen scar that he bore both in his heart and mind. His heart carried the weight of a
  • Through Good Days & Bad: A Caregiver’s Account for Supporting His Wife’s Recovery from Invisible Wounds

    There are many roles a person will play in a lifetime. For military families, these roles often cross the threshold of personal and professional life. As an active-duty security forces training instructor at Lackland Air Force Base (AFB), Technical Sgt. Justin Goad can list Airman, father, husband, and caregiver as just a few of the roles he cherishes most. It was not until TSgt Goad’s wife, retired Master Sgt. Lisa Goad, sought treatment for her post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that he reconsidered how he could better support her and the Airmen that he mentors each day.
  • Shift Back to Normal: How Master Sgt. Michael Myers Found Resilience through Humility and Helping Others

    After fighting for a decade with his invisible wounds, Master Sergeant Michael Myers recognizes the need for Airmen to seek treatment at an early stage. Now, as a Superintendent for the Office of the Warrior Advocate (OWA) and an Ambassador for the Air Force Wounded Warrior (AFW2) program, Myers has dedicated his life to helping others overcome their invisible wounds and calling all Airmen to speak openly about their mental health.
  • How Resilience Training Changed a Life

    After seeking treatment for alcohol dependence and devoting himself to resilience building, Technical Sergeant Joshua Williamson is a changed man, husband, father, and Airman.“The Air Force Resilience course is not just for our career, it’s a life course. It has helped me so much in both my career and my personal life,” he
  • A Medic’s Experience Unpacking Treatment for Invisible Wounds

    Seeking treatment can provide Airmen with the tools, coping methods, and support they need to address invisible wounds. Senior Master Sgt. Phillip Sharpe, an experienced medic, recognizes first-hand the importance of encouraging other Airmen to seek help for their invisible wounds.As a superintendent of an in-patient medical facility, SMSgt Sharpe
  • Air Force Aviator Offers Advice on Finding the Right Counselor

    Capt Casey Ross is an Air Force aviator with the 120th Airlift Wing of the Montana Air National Guard, stationed at Great Falls Air National Guard Base at Great Falls International Airport in Great Falls, Mont. After she was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to childhood trauma, finding the right counselor was a critical
  • The Journey to Seeking Help for Multiple Traumas

    “We all experience traumas in our lives. Life is stressful by itself—and there are members in uniform and their families dealing with additional stressors that the civilian population might not understand.” Retired Master Sgt. Adam Boccher finishes this thought, “I would tell people, it’s normal to seek help when you experience a traumatic event.
  • Technical Sgt. Joshua Williamson: From Coping to Seeking Treatment to Helping Airmen Stay Resilient

    Invisible wounds are as real and severe as physical wounds. If left untreated invisible wounds can have negative impacts on an Airman’s personal and professional life. It’s important for Airmen to recognize signs and symptoms of invisible wounds in themselves and in their peers, to ensure a mentally strong, resilient, and lethal Total Force. The Air Force is committed to supporting Airmen living with invisible wounds by providing a wide range of resources to support their recovery journey.
  • Capt. Joseph Siler to Fellow Airmen: "Go In, Get Help, and Get Back to the Fight"

    Invisible wounds are as real and severe as physical wounds. If left untreated invisible wounds can have negative impacts on an Airman’s personal and professional life. It’s important for Airmen to recognize signs and symptoms of invisible wounds in themselves and in their peers, to ensure a mentally strong, resilient, and lethal Total Force. The Air Force is committed to supporting Airmen living with invisible wounds by providing a wide range of resources to support their recovery journey.
  • Recognizing the Signs of Invisible Wounds and Promoting a Culture of Support

    Invisible wounds are as real and severe as physical wounds. If left untreated invisible wounds can have negative impacts on an Airman’s personal and professional life. It’s important for Airmen to recognize signs and symptoms of invisible wounds in themselves and in their peers, to ensure a mentally strong, resilient, and lethal Total Force. The Air Force is committed to supporting Airmen living with invisible wounds by providing a wide range of resources to support their recovery journey.
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