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  • Care beyond duty

    Airmen all over the world suffer from both visible and invisible wounds that may not always be recognized by their wingmen, and the Air Force Wounded Warrior program is available to those who need help.
  • We are all healers

    Trauma is a part of life.  This is the adage of Trauma Specialist Peter Levine who reminds us that most of us have experienced or will experience an event that feels threatening or foreboding in such a way that it shakes our sense of reality.  This has been the case since the beginning of evolution.  Our ancestors experienced trauma and our children will likely experience some form of trauma. 
  • Seeking mental health treatment: 49th Maintenance Group chief shares his experience with PTSD

    “Dealing with a traumatic event from 2011 in Afghanistan, I realize now that I probably needed help long before 2018, but at the time I felt like I’d figured out how to control the ghosts in my head. I forced myself to keep them at bay, and instead of dealing with my problems, I just let them fester,” recalled Chief Master Sgt. Eric Corvin, 49th Maintenance Group Quality Assurance superintendent, as he opened up about his post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • Capt. Joseph Siler: "Go In, Get Help, Get Back to the Fight"

    The news story shows a drone operation-the screen lights ups with a flash, followed by the crumbling of a building. To the viewer at home, it is a smooth, seamless operation far away. But to Capt. Joseph Siler, he would tell you that it took a team of highly-trained and dedicated intelligence professionals to carry out the critical mission
  • A Day That Resonates

     By looking at him you wouldn’t know it, but Tech Sgt. Trevor Brewer, a flight chief with the 72nd Security Forces Squadron at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, has deep scars from a day seven years ago that took the lives of two fellow Airmen, and severely wounded two others. His wounds are invisible. He has post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • CARE Event spotlight: Paula Pareja

    Recent statistics published by the Anxiety and Depression Association of America estimate that roughly 7.7 million Americans age 18 and older suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. Combine that with the fact that women are twice as likely to develop this over men and that those who have experienced traumatic events are at an increased
  • Drug-monitoring innovations help providers assist patients

    Two Military Health System innovations are helping ensure best practices for patients with pain, and for those who have been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. According to Chris Nichols, the Defense Health Agency’s program manager for Enterprise Intelligence and Data Solutions, the MHS Opioid Registry utilizes cutting-edge technology
  • Air Force Widow vows to bring awareness to invisible wounds

    Air Force veteran Stacey Pavenski, 46, of Palm Bay, Florida, has post traumatic stress disorder, but she didn’t get it from serving in combat. It came from her husband’s combat struggles that drove him to take his own life in their bedroom, Sept. 18, 2017, while she was in the kitchen. He was 45.That fateful day has led her on a journey to bring
  • A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD

    Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty.One of the most effective therapies, practiced by many Air Force mental health professionals, is prolonged exposure therapy.PTSD symptoms can create a network of fear. Memories and sensations
  • Exposing invisible wounds: A personal story about PTSD, healing

    Tech. Sgt. Joshua Brooks landed at Balad Air Base, Iraq, for the first time in January 2010. An airman 1st class at the time, Brooks was eager to be on his first deployment for the Air Force. “I was so excited about going. I was really blue early in my career--really blue,” Brooks said.  Brooks, a munitions troop, worked at night, building bombs,
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