HomeMedia

News Search

Results:
Tag: invisible wounds
Clear
  • Through Good Days & Bad: A Caregiver’s Account for Supporting His Wife’s Recovery from Invisible Wounds

    There are many roles a person will play in a lifetime. For military families, these roles often cross the threshold of personal and professional life. As an active-duty security forces training instructor at Lackland Air Force Base (AFB), Technical Sgt. Justin Goad can list Airman, father, husband, and caregiver as just a few of the roles he cherishes most. It was not until TSgt Goad’s wife, retired Master Sgt. Lisa Goad, sought treatment for her post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that he reconsidered how he could better support her and the Airmen that he mentors each day.
  • Shift Back to Normal: How Master Sgt. Michael Myers Found Resilience through Humility and Helping Others

    After fighting for a decade with his invisible wounds, Master Sergeant Michael Myers recognizes the need for Airmen to seek treatment at an early stage. Now, as a Superintendent for the Office of the Warrior Advocate (OWA) and an Ambassador for the Air Force Wounded Warrior (AFW2) program, Myers has dedicated his life to helping others overcome their invisible wounds and calling all Airmen to speak openly about their mental health.
  • How Resilience Training Changed a Life

    After seeking treatment for alcohol dependence and devoting himself to resilience building, Technical Sergeant Joshua Williamson is a changed man, husband, father, and Airman.“The Air Force Resilience course is not just for our career, it’s a life course. It has helped me so much in both my career and my personal life,” he
  • A Medic’s Experience Unpacking Treatment for Invisible Wounds

    Seeking treatment can provide Airmen with the tools, coping methods, and support they need to address invisible wounds. Senior Master Sgt. Phillip Sharpe, an experienced medic, recognizes first-hand the importance of encouraging other Airmen to seek help for their invisible wounds.As a superintendent of an in-patient medical facility, SMSgt Sharpe
  • Living with PTSD: You Are Not Alone

    I was diagnosed in 1995, well before the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program’s inception. My leadership was helpful, but they also had expectations of performance. They looked at my behavior as they would anyone else and were quick to punish if I acted out of line. However, they were also aware that I was dealing with something they didn’t fully understand and gave me the room to go to appointments for counseling and deal with the crushing weight of what was going on.
  • PTSD Awareness: Know When You Aren’t You

    According to the National Center for PTSD, the disorder is a mental health problem that some develop after experiencing or witnessing a lift-threatening event, like combat, a natural disaster, a car accident or sexual assault. Some people experience an event, have a grieving period, and then return to their old self with distant memories of what happened. Those who suffer from PTSD are unable to make the event a distant memory and become highly distressed when remembering that time in their life.
  • Month of the Military Caregiver: Hidden Heroes

    May is recognized as the Department of Defense’s Month of the Military Caregiver. This time is used to honor, commend, and show appreciation for those that care for wounded, ill and injured service members. The Air Force Wounded Warrior Program (AFW2) has a Caregiver Support and Family Program to assist caretakers in multiple ways,
  • How Leaders Helped Maj. Harmer Find the Support to Overcome His Invisible Wounds

    In 2004, Maj Chris Harmer left an abusive childhood home and joined the Air Force to be part of something larger than himself. He quickly found a home in the AF Medical Community and flourished both at work and at home over the next decade. “All felt right in life,” recalls Harmer, along with his wife of 16 years, Shelley.Then the symptoms began.In
  • Fighting the demons: A "typical" Defender's story

    If there is a “typical” security forces Airman, Master Sgt. Dwayne Pyle (ret) says he was it. He loved his job and felt he was good at it, even though he did get into a little trouble during his first assignment in Germany.
  • Master Sgt. Jessica Clayton: An invisible wounds story of multiple traumas, continuous recovery, and resilience

    No matter where you’re from or your AFSC, everyone is at risk of developing an invisible wound. Any exposure to a traumatic event can be a trigger and every person responds to trauma differently. For some, a blow to the head, a serious accident, or a painful event could be enough, while for others it may take years of repeated combat exposure or
RSS

Archive