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  • CARE Event spotlight: Paula Pareja

    Recent statistics published by the Anxiety and Depression Association of America estimate that roughly 7.7 million Americans age 18 and older suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. Combine that with the fact that women are twice as likely to develop this over men and that those who have experienced traumatic events are at an increased
  • Finding healing through helping others

    “Seeking care never slowed me down; it helped me through my toughest times.” Senior Master Sgt. Richard “Joe” Chwalik has been through a lifetime’s worth of setbacks; incidents that have left long-lasting emotional scars. Yet, he found his way through the darkness by asking for help when he needed it most.  Like many, Chwalik witnessed a lot during
  • Volunteers needed for invisible wounds interviews

    The Air Force is seeking volunteers, including commanders at every level, to participate in interviews that will be used to develop a strategy to provide better care and support for Airmen and their families struggling with invisible wounds such as post-traumatic stress, traumatic brain injury and major depression. A Booz Allen Hamilton culture
  • Every journey begins with a single step – An Airman’s story of resiliency (Part 1)

    This started as a story about an Airman fighting cancer, overcoming the odds, and returning to active duty. Unfortunately, stories about cancer are rarely so simple, and just when the finish line is in site, new challenges can present themselves. Such is the case for Maj. Stephanie Proellochs, a Medical Service Corps (MSC) officer, who after a year of treatment and the amputation of her left foot, thought she was cancer-free in November.
  • Air Force tackles Traumatic Brain Injury with early detection and holistic approach to treatment

    With over 3,000 cases of traumatic brain injury on average per year, TBI continues to be a significant issue for Airmen and readiness. TBI is an invisible wound, meaning the lack of physical markers often makes it difficult to detect or for others to understand the severity. Understanding the symptoms of TBI is crucial for immediate evaluation and treatment and to ensure medical readiness with minimal downtime. The Air Force Medical Service continues to improve TBI care with the upcoming Invisible Wounds Center at Eglin Air Force Base.
  • Celebrating 10 years of IDES

    On Nov. 26, 2017, the Departments of Defense (DoD) and Veterans Affairs (VA) observed the 10th anniversary of the implementation of the Integrated Disability Evaluation System (IDES), which integrates and streamlines both Departments’ processes for evaluating and compensating service members separated or retired from the military due to disability. DoD and VA commemorated the IDES launch with a ceremony at the VA Central Office in Washington D.C., Nov. 28, 2017. During the event, senior officials from both departments reflected on key milestones and accomplishments of the process which has, to date, evaluated more than 190,000 service members.
  • Take command: Increases to TRICARE pharmacy copayments coming Feb. 1, 2018

    On Feb. 1, 2018, copayments for prescription drugs at TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery and retail pharmacies will increase. These changes are required by law and affect TRICARE beneficiaries who are not active duty service members.
  • Continuing an Air Force career - hope after a breast cancer diagnosis

    The pink ribbon that symbolizes National Breast Cancer Awareness might be seen as a somber image, but it also represents hope and the many survivors. As awareness, support, and research funding have increased, more and more women are surviving breast cancer and returning to their careers.
  • Invisible wounds: Finding a voice

    Air Force leadership and wounded warriors came together to speak out on invisible wounds during a panel discussion at this year’s Air Force Association Air, Space and Cyber Conference, Sept. 18, 2017.
  • A former pilot’s silent struggle

    “I remember coming home from a combat deployment to Afghanistan in 2010, and I just knew I was bringing back more baggage than I originally left with. There are things you experience that, simply put, change you forever. I have never been the man I once was after experiencing what I did overseas.”  Posttraumatic stress disorder can be a potentially
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