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  • Capt. Casey Ross: “I Owe my Life to my Commanders”

    Invisible wounds are as real and severe as physical wounds. If left untreated invisible wounds can have negative impacts on an Airman’s personal and professional life. It’s important for Airmen to recognize signs and symptoms of invisible wounds in themselves and in their peers, to ensure a mentally strong, resilient, and lethal Total Force. The Air Force is committed to supporting Airmen living with invisible wounds by providing a wide range of resources to support their recovery journey.
  • From Feeling Fine to Triggered: Recognizing the Signs and Symptoms of Invisible Wounds

    Invisible wounds are as real and severe as physical wounds. If left untreated invisible wounds can have negative impacts on an Airman’s personal and professional life. It’s important for Airmen to recognize signs and symptoms of invisible wounds in themselves and in their peers, to ensure a mentally strong, resilient, and lethal Total Force. The Air Force is committed to supporting Airmen living with invisible wounds by providing a wide range of resources to support their recovery journey.
  • Living with PTSD: You Are Not Alone

    I was diagnosed in 1995, well before the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program’s inception. My leadership was helpful, but they also had expectations of performance. They looked at my behavior as they would anyone else and were quick to punish if I acted out of line. However, they were also aware that I was dealing with something they didn’t fully understand and gave me the room to go to appointments for counseling and deal with the crushing weight of what was going on.
  • PTSD Awareness: Know When You Aren’t You

    According to the National Center for PTSD, the disorder is a mental health problem that some develop after experiencing or witnessing a lift-threatening event, like combat, a natural disaster, a car accident or sexual assault. Some people experience an event, have a grieving period, and then return to their old self with distant memories of what happened. Those who suffer from PTSD are unable to make the event a distant memory and become highly distressed when remembering that time in their life.
  • Month of the Military Caregiver: Hidden Heroes

    May is recognized as the Department of Defense’s Month of the Military Caregiver. This time is used to honor, commend, and show appreciation for those that care for wounded, ill and injured service members. The Air Force Wounded Warrior Program (AFW2) has a Caregiver Support and Family Program to assist caretakers in multiple ways,
  • How Leaders Helped Maj. Harmer Find the Support to Overcome His Invisible Wounds

    In 2004, Maj Chris Harmer left an abusive childhood home and joined the Air Force to be part of something larger than himself. He quickly found a home in the AF Medical Community and flourished both at work and at home over the next decade. “All felt right in life,” recalls Harmer, along with his wife of 16 years, Shelley.Then the symptoms began.In
  • Fighting the demons: A "typical" Defender's story

    If there is a “typical” security forces Airman, Master Sgt. Dwayne Pyle (ret) says he was it. He loved his job and felt he was good at it, even though he did get into a little trouble during his first assignment in Germany.
  • Master Sgt. Jessica Clayton: An invisible wounds story of multiple traumas, continuous recovery, and resilience

    No matter where you’re from or your AFSC, everyone is at risk of developing an invisible wound. Any exposure to a traumatic event can be a trigger and every person responds to trauma differently. For some, a blow to the head, a serious accident, or a painful event could be enough, while for others it may take years of repeated combat exposure or
  • Tech. Sgt. Brewer speaks at B-52 resiliency tactical pause

    U.S. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein recently said in a note to commanders that suicide is an adversary killing more Airmen than any enemy on the planet.In order to address rising suicide rates in the Air Force, a resiliency tactical pause was ordered with each wing at liberty to handle the day how they felt best.  A combined B-52
  • Wounded Warrior speaks so others can

    WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio – As Air Force suicides trend upward, Wounded Warriors like retired Master Sgt. Adam Boccher are pleading with Airmen through their own stories to share the burden of breaking barriers before barriers break them.“I thought that if I asked for help, I would look weak. I couldn’t look weak,” said Boccher, Air
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